Muwashahat Rhythms Group 1

 Ayyub Pronunciation
 
2
4
       
or
2
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Salim Sahhab Orchestra, Egypt Muwashah Ya Man Nasha in maqam Nahawand.
 


Ayyub (also spelled Ayoub) is primarily used in Sufi music and folk. It is also called Zaar. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Ayyub in Arabic is the byblical name Jobe.


 Fallahi Pronunciation
 
2
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Salim Sahhab Orchestra, Egypt Muwashah Ya Man Nasha in maqam Nahawand.
 


Ayyub (also spelled Ayoub) is primarily used in Sufi music and folk. It is also called Zaar. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Ayyub in Arabic is the byblical name Jobe.


 Malfuf Pronunciation
 
2
4
       
or
2
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Al Kindi Ensemble, Syria Muwashah Ya Sahi s-Sabru Waha Minni in maqam Bayati.
 


Malfuf is primarily used in folk and popular Arabic music. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Malfuf in Arabic means Wrapped or Spun Around (Malfuf feels very short and cyclical).

Common Modulations: Ayyub.

 


 Wahdah W'Noss Pronunciation
 
4
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Al Kindi Ensemble, Syria Muwashah Ya Sahi s-Sabru Waha Minni in maqam Bayati.
 


Malfuf is primarily used in folk and popular Arabic music. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Malfuf in Arabic means Wrapped or Spun Around (Malfuf feels very short and cyclical).

Common Modulations: Ayyub.

 


 Karachi Pronunciation
 
2
4
       
or
2
4
       

Recording Samples:

Under construction...
 


Karachi is primarily used in tarab and popular Arabic music. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Karachi is a city in Pakistan.

Common Modulations: Malfuf.

 


 Samai Darij Pronunciation
 
3
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Salim Sahhab Orchestra, Egypt Muwashah Ya Man Laaibat Bihi Shamulu in maqam Rast.
 


Samai Darij (simply called darij, which means widespread or popular in Arabic) is the simplest form of 3/4. I can also be played in 3/8, which feels faster and lighter.

See Also: Yuruk Samai


 Maqsum Pronunciation
 
4
4
       
or
4
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Al Kindi Ensemble, Syria Muwashah Adir Lana Akwab in maqam Saba.
 


Maqsum is probably the most recognizable Arabic rhythm, primarily used in folk and popular music. It is rarely used as a rhythm for Muwashahat.

Maqsum means Divided in Arabic.

Common Modulation: Masmudi Saghir.

 


 Masmudi Saghir (Baladi) Pronunciation
 
4
4
       
or
4
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Sabah Fakhri Orchestra, Syria Muwashah Ya Sahi s-Sabru Waha Minni in maqam Bayati.
Recording by Al Kindi Ensemble, Syria Muwashah Instrumental by Al Kindi Ensemble in maqam Bayati.
 


Masmudi Saghir is primarily used in folk and popular Arabic music. It is seldom used as a rhythm for Muwashahat. This rhythm is a fast version of Masmudi Kabir.

Also called: Baladi.

Saghir means Small or Little in Arabic.

Common Modulation: Maqsum.

 


 Wahda Pronunciation
 
4
4
       
or
4
4
       

Recording Samples:

Recording by Sabah Fakhri Orchestra, Syria Muwashah Kahhala s-Sihru Uyanan in maqam Bayati.
Recording by Sabah Fakhri Orchestra, Syria Muwashah Ana La Asmaau l-Mulim in maqam Bayati.
 


Wahda means One or Single in Arabic.

Wahda is primarily used with vocal music, and is played in a slow but steady and rich style.

Although the rhythm signature of Wahda is a slowed down version of Malfuf, they radically differ in style and feel.

 


 Thurayya Pronunciation
 
5
8
     

Recording Samples:

Recording by Sabah Fakhri Orchestra, Syria Muwashah Fil Rowd Ana Shufti l-Gamil in Hijaz Kar Kurd.
 


Thurayya in Arabic means the heavens.

Also called: Usul Aghar Aqsaq (Aqsaq in Turkish means Limping, and Usul is used to mean Rhythm).


More Muwashahat Rhythms:   Group 1 Group 2

Group 3

Group 4 Group 5

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